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Posts for: February, 2020

February 26, 2020
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TEETH AND JAW ALIGNMENT

If your baby sucks a pacifier, their thumb or fingers, the shape of their mouth or their tooth alignment may be affected.  If your child breaks the habit before age 3 their bite will probablycorrect itself and if they stop before the permanent front teeth come in there’s a chance his bite will self-correct, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  Also, avoid breastfeeding to soothe your baby because prolonged breastfeeding can lead to misalignment of your child’s jaw.  

ORTHODONTICS

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends an initial visit to the orthodontist by age 7.  At this age your child has enough permanent teeth to diagnose a potential orthodontic problem, and some problems are easier (and cheaper!) to correct if discovered early.  Prompt treatment can also produce better results since the jaw and facial bones have not finished growing.  Some specific issues to discuss with your child’s orthodontist are early or late loss of baby teeth, thumb sucking, difficulty chewing, biting the cheek or roof of the mouth, grinding or clenching the teeth or breathing through the mouth.

February is NATIONAL CHILDREN’S DENTAL HEALTH MONTH!  Dental health is critically important to the overall well-being of your child.  Developing good oral hygiene habits early will prevent gum disease, cavities and tooth decay in the future.


Give your child the best chance for a healthy life.

From putting up baby gates to purchasing the best car seats, parents do a lot to keep their babies healthy and safe. Of course, one of the best ways to keep your child healthy is to get them vaccinated. Read on to learn how the pediatricians here at Growing Together Pediatrics in Ocoee, FL, can protect your child with the help of immunizations.

How do vaccines work?

Vaccines work together with your child's natural defenses to help boost immunity to certain illnesses and diseases. Upon administration, vaccines introduce either a dead or weakened virus form into the body, triggering the body to produce antibodies, and thus strengthening the overall immune system.

Vaccines have eradicated or nearly eradicated diseases that decades ago led to disability, serious health complications, and even death in children and teens.

Do vaccines cause disease?

There is absolutely no way for your child to get a disease from vaccines; however, there is a slight chance that they could develop a very mild reaction from the administration. It’s important to note that even if this occurs, it’s always very mild and far less serious than if your child were to develop the actual disease.

When should my child get vaccinated?

Your child will get their first vaccines right after birth, usually when they are still in the hospital. Of course, trying to remember all the vaccines your little one will need can be nearly impossible. Fortunately, the CDC provides a recommended vaccine list. Tack this list up on your fridge so you know when it’s time to schedule your child’s next checkup.

What are the benefits of getting your child vaccinated?

The most obvious benefit is that you protect your little one from serious diseases. Of course, you also protect the community, too. Babies cannot get vaccinated against everything; therefore, they are more susceptible to certain diseases until they’ve been vaccinated.

By vaccinating young children, you can help to protect the elderly, children with compromised immune systems, and other susceptible groups that may not be able to get vaccinated.

Contact your Ocoee pediatricians today

Is it time to get your child vaccinated? Do you have questions about childhood vaccinations? If so, call Growing Together Pediatrics in Ocoee, FL, today at (407) 770-1414 to schedule a consultation with your pediatrician.


February 11, 2020
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February is NATIONAL CHILDREN’S DENTAL HEALTH MONTH!  Dental health is critically important to the overall well-being of your child.  Developing good oral hygiene habits early will prevent gum disease, cavities and tooth decay in the future.

YOUR BABY’S FIRST DENTAL VISIT

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that your child sees a dentist within six months of their first tooth or by age 1. Growing Together Pediatrics can help you find a pediatric dentist when it’s time to schedule your baby’s first dental visit!

Here are a few questions to ask when scheduling the first visit:

  • Is your office accepting new patients?
  • Does your office take my child’s insurance?
  • Is anyone on your staff able to speak my language and/or translate for me?
  • Is your office open evenings or weekends?

The first visit allows your child to meet the dentist in a relaxed, non-threatening way.  Some dentists ask you to sit in the dental chair with your child on your lap.  The dentist will check for tooth decay, inspect your child’s bite and explore the gums and jaw.  It’s usually a short, friendly visit but be sure to ask questions or discuss any developmental concerns.

YOUR CHILD’S ONGOING DENTAL CARE

Growing Together Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend your child sees a dentist every 6 months.  These dental visits are just like your well-child visits to our office!  Regular visits allow the dentist to get to know your child’s specific needs so they can provide the best care possible.

Expect the dentist to gently examine their teeth and gums or provide a cleaning if necessary.  Cavity prevention can include fluoride treatments or dental sealants, which protect the chewing surfaces of the back teeth.

X-rays can help the dentist find small areas of decay or cavities between teeth that may not be visible during the exam.  Dentists also use x-rays to determine if there is enough room in your child’s mouth to fit all their incoming teeth or see if baby teeth are falling out fast enough to allow permanent teeth to come in correctly.  Once your child is older x-rays can reveal the development of wisdom teeth.

Most importantly, never use a visit to the dentist as a threat!  Stay positive about your child’s dental visits!


February 05, 2020
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February is NATIONAL CHILDREN’S DENTAL HEALTH MONTH!  Dental health is critically important to the overall well-being of your child.  Developing good oral hygiene habits early will prevent gum disease, cavities and tooth decay in the future.

KEEPING YOUR BABY’S MOUTH CLEAN

Taking care of your baby’s mouth is essential, even before the first tooth erupts around age 6 months.  Growing Together Pediatrics recommends you use gauze or a clean, moist washcloth to wipe your baby’s gums twice a day, especially after a night feeding.  

Never “clean” a pacifier or bottle in your mouth before offering it to your baby because germs that cause gum disease and tooth decay can pass from your mouth to your baby’s mouth.  Clean the pacifier with mild soap and water and get a new one once it is worn or broken.  Never dip your baby’s pacifier in honey, syrup or other sweet foods because the sugar can lead to tooth decay. 

BRUSHING AND FLOSSING

Encouraging good brushing and flossing habits is one of the most important ways to keep your child’s teeth healthy.  Once your child can spit, you can switch to a soft-bristled, baby or child size toothbrush with a small amount of toothpaste.  Children under age 3 should use fluoride toothpaste no larger than a grain of rice while children age 3-6 need to use fluoride toothpaste about the size of a pea.  Start flossing your child’s teeth as soon as two teeth touch.  To prevent cavities, brush in the morning then brush and floss before bed.

It can be challenging to find a comfortable position to brush and floss your child’s teeth, but two positions to try are standing behind your child in front of the mirror or sitting on the floor with your child’s head in your lap.  If your independent toddler wants to brush by themselves, you can use a song, a counting game or a colorful timer to be sure they brush for 2 minutes.  Create excitement by allowing your child to decide what flavor toothpaste to buy or let them pick a toothbrush with a favorite character on the handle.  Replace toothbrushes every 3 to 4 months.  Remember, a child under age 8 can’t brush their teeth correctly so you need to brush their teeth, too.  Periodically check your child’s teeth for white, yellow or brown spots and/or lines because these can be early signs of tooth decay.

Please discuss any concerns or questions about your child’s basic dental care with us!


We love Dr. Barfield, Dr. Rodriguez, Dr. Antenor and Dr. Diogene, the amazing female physicians here at GrowingTogether Pediatrics, but did you know only 36% of professionally active American physicians are female?

Today, February 3, marks National Women Physicians Day which is a day to honor the progress made by female doctors in a historically male-dominated profession.  The date marks the birthday of Elisabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States in 1849.  Blackwell graduated from Geneva College, in rural New York, at the top of her class despite challenges and discrimination from professors, classmates and local townspeople.  She went on to open the New York Infirmary for Women and Children in 1857, she founded a medical college in New York City in 1868 and became a professor of gynecology at the new London School of Medicine for Women in 1875.  Dr. Blackwell started the movement that helped women gain admission into the field of medicine but young female physicians still face obstacles and inequity in the workplace so there’s still more work to be done!

Join Growing Together Pediatrics and National Women Physicians Day in celebrating and supporting women physicians as doctors, colleagues, friends and family!




Office Hours

Orlando Office Hours
Monday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
Ocoee Office Hours
Monday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Tuesday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Wednesday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Thursday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Friday: 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

Growing Together Pediatrics

Phone: (407) 770-1414
5164 S. Conway Rd. Orlando, FL 32812
1583 E. Silver Star Rd. Ocoee, FL 34761